Never Let ‘Em See You Sweat

Shelley and her husband Dave dreamt of taking a trip to New Zealand but never could afford to take the time off to go. Between the lack of funds and her being a graduate student, it didn’t look like something that would happen anytime soon. You know how it is, sounds great but just can’t afford it.

Well, Shelley and Dave got pregnant (I guess really it’s all Shelley on the being pregnant part) and they knew if they didn’t find a way to afford it now, the next eighteen years would make it even less affordable.

After eight weeks of planning and saving, Shelley and Dave finally scheduled a two-week vacation to New Zealand. Their flight was scheduled for May 14th. Everything was looking up.

There was only one problem…Shelley had been struggling with plantar fasciitis, excessive pain in the heel of her foot for the last year or so. She got a shot that helped resolve the plantar fasciitis, but after a few months, the pain migrated from the front portion of her heel to the back of her heel and lower leg.

She went to her doctor and was diagnosed with Achilles tendonitis, an overuse injury that causes pain at the back of the leg and foot where the Achilles tendon attaches to the heel bone. Months went by and it got progressively worse.

The pain was debilitating, making it very difficult to walk without hurting…the trip was quickly approaching and the last thing Shelley wanted to do was cancel. But if she couldn’t walk without excruciating pain, the trip would be pointless…their vacation plans involved lots of walking. New Zealand just wouldn’t be as enjoyable if she had to limp along and stop to rest every few steps. What was Shelley to do?

She contacted me on April 24th via email to see if I might be able to help. She wrote:

Hi Jarian,

I’ve been dealing with foot pain for a while – at first it was plantar fasciitis, which eventually got better with a steroid shot, but now I’ve been diagnosed with Achilles tendonitis. It’s just been getting worse all semester. I was using a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory gel on it, but had to stop using it when I got pregnant. (I’m currently 8 weeks.) My husband and I have a huge trip we’ve been planning and saving for coming up on May 14th, and I was wondering if you think it’s possible to address the tendonitis and eliminate the pain before the trip? That’s only 3 weeks away though, so it might not be realistic. If you do think it’s possible, what would the time/cost be to address just this issue for now?

Thanks for your help,
Shelley

Did I think it was possible? I know it’s possible. I live for these moments, opportunities to be clutch, like Michael Jordan in the fourth quarter (yes, Jordan…not Lebron, not even Kobe…JORDAN.) This is what I train for…

So I responded:

First of all, congratulations on the pregnancy! I’m excited for you guys!

Concerning your foot pain, I like to treat Achilles tendonitis in four sessions to be completed within one week if possible. We may need to add a follow-up session or two, but I think we can achieve significant pain reduction in seven days. I suggest five sessions initially, four within one week and an additional session one week later. Regular pricing is $120 per session so five sessions would total $600. If you choose to prepay, we can do the initial 4 sessions for $400, and if the follow-up session is needed we can do that for $100.

We can schedule a time to do a free consult or jump right in and begin treatment. Whenever you’re ready, we can get started immediately.

Shelley replied:

Thanks! We’re really excited! It’s been a long time coming.

The doctor that I saw said that if the anti-inflammatory gel didn’t work, he’d have to put me in a boot to give the tendon a rest. I just don’t want to end up paying an additional $500 for a boot if the therapy helps, but then it still just needs to be immobilized to cure it (especially since money is going to be tight now). Do you think that the massage therapy can achieve the same thing as the boot (or better)?

Now please don’t misunderstand me, doctors are very knowledgeable people and are excellent at what they do. If I break my leg, rupture my spleen or ingest poison, don’t take me to a massage therapist…take me to a doctor, STAT! But when it comes to afflictions like plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis or tennis elbow, take me to someone who specializes in the (neuro) musculoskeletal system. Take me to someone like me. In Shelley’s case, she needed to see someone like me…someone who spends countless hours studying, observing and handling the (neuro) musculoskeletal system, that is the system of muscles, bones and the nerves that make them move.

I didn’t take Shelley’s predicament lightly. She had a choice to make and she couldn’t afford to make the wrong one. She also couldn’t afford to simply try everything in hopes that one of them might work. In essence, she was saying I can only afford one approach, one choice. Which one is best? I’m definitely not a stranger to having limited choices but still needing the best outcome possible. So I responded:

I believe the therapy can achieve better results than the boot. The boot is prescribed to immobilize the tendon to provide rest and prevent further irritation. The therapy, on the other hand, is designed to improve functional movement without causing further inflammation, improve flexibility, increase blood flow to the painful area to speed the healing/repair of the tendon and eliminate compensation patterns that contribute to the Achilles tendonitis (and plantar fasciitis.)

After a couple of days, Shelley responded:

Ok, let’s go for it. How long is each appointment, and do I just choose the plantar fasciitis option on your booking page?

I responded:

I ask you to set aside approx. 2 hours per session. The first one will most likely be the longest. You can choose the plantar fasciitis option when booking online.

Shelley was counting on me to get her New Zealand ready and I wasn’t about to let her down.

We started her treatment program on April 30th. I was so eager to get her up and on her way to New Zealand. I did everything I knew to help her achieve the best results. But then…

Shelley sent me this email on May 2nd:

Hi Jarian,

I think we severely underestimated how out of shape that left leg was. I’m having a hard time walking around today because my calf muscle is so sore and does not want to function. Should I go ahead and come in today or should I wait a day for it to heal up?

I wasn’t too surprised, but it’s still not what I wanted to here. I responded:

I would still like you to come in today. We’ll skip the movement and focus on relieving the delayed-onset muscle soreness with massage and gentle stretching. Don’t worry, it’s completely normal to feel soreness after the work we did Monday. We can make adjustments to the protocol until you build up more strength.

She came in that day and we stepped off the gas a bit. She was scheduled to come on May 4th, but she contacted me that morning saying she was still sore and finding it difficult to move around. Oh no…

We delayed the treatment and resumed on May 8th. She was feeling better and I was ready to get to work. The trip was only six days away. It was the fourth quarter. It was time to deliver.

Her pain had decreased slightly by May 10th, but we still hadn’t reached our goal. I could tell she was getting nervous. Did she make the wrong decision? Did I overpromise but under deliver? Just trust the process, I told myself. Trust the body. Do the work, the results will come.

I added a fifth session just to make sure we would achieve the best results. This one was on me I told her, no need to pay more. I had to be sure she could walk when she reached New Zealand.

She came to the clinic on May 12th, just two days before the trip. I asked her to rate her pain on a scale of 0 to 10, 0 being no pain and 10 the worst pain.

“Zero'” she said. She had a little tenderness in her foot, but she could tell the pain was gone and she was on her way to optimal health. By the end of the session, the tenderness n the foot was gone also.

“I never doubted you, but I was kinda worried there for a second,” she said.

“Me too,” I thought to myself. But I would never say that out loud. When it’s the fourth quarter and you got the ball, never let ’em see you sweat.

Click here to see how I helped Melissa reduce foot pain from 8 to 1 on the pain scale in six days!

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Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction

 

Jon Kabat-Zinn, a world authority on the use of mindfulness training in the management of clinical problems, defines it as: “Paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally.”

Research indicates that Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) training can have a significant therapeutic effect for those experiencing stress, anxiety, high blood pressure, depression, chronic pain, migraines, heart conditions, diabetes and other ailments.

Participants in an eight-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program showed decreased gray-matter density in the amygdala, a structure of the brain that plays an important role in anxiety and stress. Participants also showed increased gray-matter density in the hippocampus, a region of the brain important for learning and memory.

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) training was created and is conducted at the University of Massachusetts Medical School by  a certified, highly credentialed (psychiatrist, Ph.D., etc.) MBSR trainer. MBSR training can cost $1,000 or more.

This online MBSR training course is 100% free, created by a fully certified MBSR instructor, and is modeled on the program founded by Jon Kabat-Zinn at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Sources

Hölzel, Britta K. et al. “Mindfulness Practice Leads to Increases in Regional Brain Gray Matter Density.” Psychiatry research 191.1 (2011): 36–43. PMC. Web. 7 Mar. 2017.

 

 

 

What is Mindfulness?

Source: Mindfulness exercises | Living Well | Living Well
Mindfulness allows you to cope with difficult and painful thoughts, feelings & sensations. Download our series of mp3 mindfulness exercises to get started.

Source: Learn How Mindfulness Can Disrupt Your Business | Inc.com
What does mindfulness have to do with success and business? Everything! Learn how this simple concept can change the way you live and work.

Source: Mindfulness takes over the corporate world
Corporations must consider the causes of workplace stress as well as ways to alleviate it, skeptics say.

Source: Mindfulness and the Popularity of Adult Coloring Books – The Atlantic
I get it.